Category Archives: Internet Explorer

Java 8 Update 171 (8u171)

The only major browser that still officially supports Java is Internet Explorer, although there are workarounds for some of the other browsers. For example, you can switch to Firefox ESR (Extended Support Release), but even that support is likely to disappear before long. Google Chrome, and other browsers that use the same engine, can only be made to show Java content by installing an extension that runs Internet Explorer in a tab.

Java’s impact on security is diminishing, but it’s still being used on older systems where upgrading to newer O/S versions is not possible. There are still a lot of Windows XP systems out there, and most of them are either running older versions of Internet Explorer or Firefox ESR.

If you’re still using Java, you should install the latest version, Java 8 Update 171 (8u171), as soon as possible. The easiest way to check which version you’re running and install any available updates is to visit Oracle’s ‘Verify Java’ page. You’ll need to do that with a Java-enabled browser. Another option is to visit the third-party Java Tester site. Again, this site won’t work unless Java is enabled.

Java 8 Update 171 includes fixes for fourteen security vulnerabilities. Other changes are documented in the Java 8 release notes and the Java 8u171 bug fixes page.

Patch Tuesday for April 2018

Microsoft’s contribution to our monthly headache starts with a post on the TechNet MSRC blog: April 2018 security update release. This brief page consists of the same boilerplate we get every month, and provides no details at all. We’re informed that “information about this month’s security updates can be found in the Security Update Guide” but there isn’t even a link to the SUG.

Analysis of the SUG for this month’s Microsoft updates shows that there are sixty updates, addressing sixty-eight vulnerabilities in Flash, Excel, Word, and other Office components, Internet Explorer, Edge, Windows, and Defender. Twenty-three of the vulnerabilities are flagged as Critical.

If your Windows computer is not configured for automatic updates, you’ll need to use Windows Update in the Control Panel to install them.


Adobe’s offering for this month’s patching fun is a new version of Flash Player: 29.0.0.140 (APSB18-08). Six security vulnerabilities — three flagged as Critical — are fixed in the new version.

If you’re using a web browser with Flash enabled, you should install Flash 29.0.0.140 as soon as possible. The embedded Flash used in Internet Explorer 11 and Edge on newer versions of Windows will get the new version via Windows Update. Chrome’s embedded Flash will be updated via Chrome’s automatic update system. To update the desktop version of Flash, visit the About Flash page.

Microsoft updates for March

I count forty-seven separate bulletins in this month’s batch of updates, which means there are roughly that same number of updates. Over seventy security vulnerabilities in Windows, Internet Explorer, Edge, Office, and .NET are addressed in the updates. There’s a Flash update in there as well, for Edge and recent versions of Internet Explorer.

This month we also get more fixes for Spectre and Meltdown, including firmware updates for somewhat older processors (Skylake, Kaby Lake, and Coffee Lake). There’s still not much available for processors that are more than a few years old.

While Microsoft continues to push people to enable automatic updates, the more cautious among us (including myself) prefer to control what is updated and when. Windows 10 users still have effectively no control over Windows updates.

You can extract additional details for this month’s updates from Microsoft’s Security Update Guide.

February updates from Microsoft

Earlier today, Microsoft released forty-two updates to address fifty-four vulnerabilities in Windows, Internet Explorer, Edge, Flash, and Office software. Fourteen of the vulnerabilities are flagged as critical, and have the potential to be used for remote code execution.

This information was extracted from Microsoft’s Security Update Guide, the rather opaque reservoir into which Microsoft now dumps its update information. Of course Microsoft would be happier if we all just enabled auto-updates, and in fact the monthly patch bulletins are now little more than a link to the SUG and a recommendation to enable auto-updates.

Patch Tuesday for January 2018

This month’s pile of Microsoft patches includes some that help to mitigate the recently-discovered Spectre and Meltdown vulnerabilities in Windows 7 and 8. Windows 10 machines received these updates last week, as soon as they were made available by Microsoft, because of course there’s no way to stop that from happening. Unfortunately for folks running some older AMD processors, the Spectre/Meltdown updates are causing Windows to crash, and Microsoft has now disabled those updates for affected computers.

It gets worse. Many antivirus products use sketchy techniques for blocking, detecting, and removing malware. Some of those activities are incompatible with this month’s Spectre/Meltdown updates for Windows. Microsoft is currently blocking those updates on computers that are missing a special registry setting: the idea is that anti-malware software will set this flag to indicate that the updates are compatible, and safe to install. On my Windows 8.1 computer, Windows Update initially did not show this month’s security-only (KB4056898) or security rollup (KB4056895) updates. That’s because (gasp) I wasn’t running any anti-malware software. To get the update, I re-enabled Windows Defender, which created the missing registry entry, and re-ran Windows Update.

There’s also a special security advisory in this month’s updates, in which Microsoft lays out the Spectre/Meltdown issue, its effect on Microsoft software, and ways to mitigate the associated vulnerabilities.

Back to our regularly-scheduled Patch Tuesday…

The January 2018 update announcement as usual contains zero useful information, serving only as a pointer to the Security Update Guide. Analysis of this month’s guide data shows that there are seventy-two updates, addressing fifty-six vulnerabilities in .NET, Internet Explorer, Edge, Office, Windows, Flash Player, Sharepoint, and SQL Server.

Patch Tuesday for December

Today, Microsoft published twenty-four updates, addressing thirty-three vulnerabilities in Flash player (for Microsoft browsers), Office, Internet Explorer, Edge, and Windows.

As usual, Microsoft’s announcement is little more than a pointer to the Security Update Guide (SUG). If you’re looking for details about any of these updates, that’s your only official option. The SUG’s user interface is somewhat headache-inducing, but there’s useful information to be had there.

Windows 10 gets these updates whether you want them or not; Windows 7 and 8.1 can be configured for automatic or manual updates. I personally don’t like the idea of updates being installed on my computers at Microsoft’s whim, so I’m sticking with manual updates. And avoiding Windows 10 completely. And gradually switching to Linux.

November updates for Adobe products

Adobe logoYesterday, Adobe announced updates for several of its main products, including Flash, Acrobat Reader, and Shockwave.

Flash 27.0.0.187 addresses five critical vulnerabilities in earlier versions. You can download the new desktop version from the main Flash download page. That page usually offers to install additional software, which you should avoid. Chrome will as usual update itself with the new version, and both Internet Explorer and Edge will get their own updates via Windows Update.

Acrobat Reader 11.0.23 includes fixes for a whopping sixty-two vulnerabilities, all flagged as critical, in earlier versions. Download the full installer from the Acrobat Reader Download Center.

Shockwave Player 12.3.1.201 addresses a single critical security issue in earlier versions. Download the new version from the Adobe Shockwave Player Download Center.

If you use Flash, Reader or Shockwave to view content from untrusted sources, or if you use a web browser with add-ons enabled for any of these technologies, you should update affected systems immediately.

Patch Tuesday for November 2017

According to Microsoft’s announcement, the November updates include patches for Internet Explorer, Edge, Windows, Office, and .NET. As usual, you have to dig into the rather awkward Security Update Guide to find additional details.

My analysis of the SUG reveals that there are fifty-three bulletins, addressing fifty-four vulnerabilities across the usual range of products. Sixteen of the vulnerabilities are flagged Critical.

If you’re interested in performing your own analysis, I strongly suggest avoiding the cumbersome SUG interface. Instead, locate the almost hidden ‘Download’ link at the top right of the updates grid and click that to open the data in Excel. From there you can use Excel’s filtering tools to wrestle the update information into more manageable lists.

October 10, 2017: Patch Tuesday

Imagine a world in which there were no software updates; no security vulnerabilities; no bugs at all. The idea of such a place makes me happy. This utopia is destined to remain a fantasy, sadly. All software has bugs, and that will never change.

Inspection of Microsoft’s Security Update Guide (SUG) as of 10am today shows the usual massive list of updates, only some of which will affect most of us. You can wade into that if you have some time and access to painkillers, or you can download the list and open it in Excel, which is a lot easier to work with, and is what I do.

Analysis of the update data shows that there are fifty updates this month. Sixteen of those updates are flagged as Critical. A total of sixty-seven vulnerabilities in Windows, Office, Internet Explorer, and Edge are addressed.

As usual, the announcement of this month’s updates does little more than tell us what we already knew: that there are updates today, and where to find them.

Time to patch those computers!

Update 2017Oct11: The Register points out that while vulnerabilities affecting Windows 10 are being patched by Microsoft as soon as they are identified, Windows 7 and 8 systems don’t get those updates until the next Patch Tuesday. This creates an opportunity for malicious persons to analyze the Windows 10 updates and create exploits that work on Windows 7 and 8.

Patch Tuesday for September 2017

This month’s updates from Microsoft include a patch for a nasty zero-day vulnerability in the .NET framework.

The announcement for this batch of updates is of course just a link to the Security Update Guide, where it’s up to the user to wade through piles of information and determine what’s relevant.

Here’s what I’ve been able to glean from my explorations: there are ninety-four updates, affecting Internet Explorer, Edge, Windows, Office, Adobe Flash Player, Skype, and the .NET Framework. A total of eighty-five vulnerabilities are addressed, twenty-nine of which are flagged as Critical.

As you may have guessed, this month we also have yet another new version of Flash. Microsoft included the new version in updates for Edge and Internet Explorer, and Chrome will get the new version via its internal auto-updater. Desktop Flash users should visit the main Flash page to get the new version. Flash 27.0.0.130 addresses two critical vulnerabilities in previous versions.