Category Archives: Security

aka infosec

Firefox 52.0.1

A single security fix is apparently the sole reason Mozilla released Firefox 52.0.1 on March 17. There was no announcement from Mozilla, but as usual, CERT picked up the slack with their own announcement. The release notes for 52.0.1 point to a related security advisory.

Firefox will offer to update itself over the next few days, but you can usually trigger an update by navigating to its About dialog (hamburger menu icon > question mark icon > About Firefox).

Patch Tuesday updates from Microsoft and Adobe

It looks like Microsoft fixed the technical issues that led to February’s updates being postponed until March. Today they announced eighteen updates that address security issues in Windows, Internet Explorer, Edge, Office, Silverlight, as well as Windows Server software, including Exchange.

Critical vulnerabilities for which updates were expected in February, including an SMB flaw in Windows (CVE-2017-0016), and two others that were disclosed by Google’s Project Zero that affect the Windows GDI library (CVE-2017-0038), and Internet Explorer and Edge (CVE-2017-0037), finally get fixes today.

A total of one hundred and forty vulnerabilities are addressed by today’s updates from Microsoft. That’s higher than usual, but of course this is two months’ worth of updates.

Adobe’s contribution to the patching fun this month is new versions of Flash and Shockwave. Flash 25.0.0.127 includes fixes for seven vulnerabilities in earlier versions, while Shockwave 12.2.8.198 resolves a single security issue in versions 12.2.7.197 and earlier.

Chrome will update itself with the new version of Flash in the next day or so, but you can usually trigger the update process by navigating to its About page. Flash updates for Internet Explorer and Edge are included in this month’s updates from Microsoft.

If you’re still using a web browser with a Flash plugin, you should make sure it’s up to date as soon as possible.

Update 2017Mar17: Ars Technica points out — quite rightly — that Microsoft still owes us all an explanation for why the February updates were cancelled. My favourite quote from the Ars article: “when marketers drive communications concerning a reported zero-day exploit, customers lose.” I’d argue that when marketing folk are the only ones talking about technical issues of any kind, we should all be very worried.

Chrome 57.0.2987.98

The latest version of Chrome includes fixes for thirty-six security vulnerabilities.

There are numerous other changes in Chrome 57.0.2987.98. Google didn’t see fit to highlight any of them in the release announcement, so you’ll have to read the browser-annihilating change log to see if any of the changes are of interest. I’m not planning to do that myself, as it’s likely to take several hours, and unlikely to be particularly rewarding.

Chrome updates itself on its own mysterious schedule, but you can usually trigger an update by going to its ‘About’ page. Because this version includes security updates, you should try to update Chrome as soon as possible.

Update 2017Mar16: Ars Technica points out that Chrome 57 includes power saving features that should extend battery life for Chrome users on laptops.

Firefox 52 – security fixes, WebAssembly support

At this point it seems clear that Mozilla has instructed its content writers to never mention version numbers in Firefox release announcements. The reason remains a mystery. Take yesterday’s announcement, for example. It begins “Today‚Äôs release of Firefox” – which makes it sound like Firefox is a new product.

Anyway… the mystery Firefox release yesterday was in fact version 52, which fixes at least twenty-eight security vulnerabilities. The new version also adds support for WebAssembly, which can dramatically improve the performance of web-based applications. Support for those annoying WiFi ‘captive portal’ hotspot login pages is improved in Firefox 52, and there are further improvements to the warnings you’ll see when you’re presented with a login form on an unencrypted connection.

Firefox 52 also removes almost all remaining support for the NPAPI plugin technology, with the lone exception being Flash, which means Silverlight, Java, Acrobat and other plugins that depend on NPAPI will no longer work. Support for the NPAPI version of Flash will apparently be removed in the next major Firefox release.

Nasty Cloudflare bug leaked sensitive information for months

Cloudflare provides caching, proxy, and security services for thousands of web sites, including some very popular ones like digitalocean.com, patreon.com, bitpay.com, news.ycombinator.com, medium.com, 4chan.org, yelp.com, okcupid.com, zendesk.com, uber.com, 23andme.com, curse.com, and minecraftforum.net.

For about five months, starting in September 2016, a truly awful bug in Cloudflare’s services caused private information from sites hosted by Cloudflare to be leaked to unrelated systems. Since the leaked information was merrily crawled and stored by all the major search engines, all that data became available to the entire planet.

The leaked data includes just about everything you wouldn’t want leaked, such as encryption keys, cookies, passwords, private messages from major dating sites, full messages from a well-known chat service, online password manager data, frames from adult video sites, and hotel bookings.

My initial reaction to the news of this leak was relief, because I don’t use Cloudflare for any of my (or my clients’) web sites. But I use other web sites and services that use Cloudflare, so my private information may have been leaked. Almost anyone who uses the web actively could be affected by this bug, and its fallout.

The bug itself has been fixed by Cloudflare. The major search engines are working with Cloudflare to scrub related private information from their databases. But the damage has already been done.

What should you do?

If you run any web sites or services that use Cloudflare, you should take action immediately, by invalidating all user sessions (e.g. login cookies). How this is done depends on the platform you’re using (WordPress, Joomla, etc.) You should probably recommend to your members/subscribers that they change their passwords.

If you use any of the affected sites or services, you should probably change the associated passwords. This may turn out to be overkill, but it’s difficult to know for certain.

The full extent of the damage caused by this bug remains to be seen. In the worst case scenario, malicious hackers noticed the bug when it first appeared, and proceeded to gather leaked information for months.

References

Continue reading Nasty Cloudflare bug leaked sensitive information for months

Shockwave 12.2.7.197

Another new Shockwave version was released this week by Adobe. Once again, the official release notes page for Shockwave 12 only shows 12.2.7.197 as the current version, and provides no details. There was no announcement.

A couple of years ago, Adobe changed the way Flash functionality is built into Shockwave, presumably to beef up Shockwave’s security, which up to that point included older, vulnerable versions of Flash. So it’s possible that these barely-documented Shockwave updates exist primarily to synchronize Shockwave’s security with the current version of Flash.

As usual, if you use a web browser with Shockwave enabled, you should install the new version as soon as possible.

Microsoft releases update for Flash

Normally, Microsoft releases updates for Flash in Edge and Internet Explorer along with everything else on the second Tuesday of each month.

This month, something went wrong with the Windows Update system, and Microsoft pushed all the February updates to March, including an expected fix for a serious SMS flaw.

Someone at Microsoft apparently realized that this decision would leave some Flash users (those using Flash in Edge and Internet Explorer) vulnerable for an extra month. Flash vulnerabilities are targeted aggressively by malicious hackers, so this is obviously a bad thing. As a result, Microsoft has released a Flash update, one week later than originally planned.

Anyone who uses Flash in Internet Explorer or Edge should visit Windows Update and install the Flash update as soon as possible.

So we do get a Microsoft Security Bulletin Summary for February 2017 after all, but it only includes a single bulletin.

Flash update fixes 13 vulnerabilities

A new version of Flash, released yesterday, addresses at least thirteen vulnerabilities in previous versions.

According to the security bulletin for Flash 24.0.0.221, the new version fixes “critical vulnerabilities that could potentially allow an attacker to take control of the affected system.”

The release notes for Flash 24.0.0.221 describe some new features that are likely only of interest to developers.

As usual, Internet Explorer and Edge will get new versions of their embedded Flash via Windows Update, while Chrome’s embedded Flash will be updated automatically.

Anyone who still uses a web browser with Flash enabled should update it as soon as possible.