Patch Tuesday for May 2020

We’re in the middle of a pandemic, but that’s no excuse to leave software unpatched. There’s certainly been no reduction in the rate at which vulnerabilities and exploits are being discovered.

This month’s contribution from Microsoft, as documented in the Security Update Guide, consists of thirty-eight updates, with corresponding bulletins, addressing one hundred and eleven vulnerabilities in .NET, Internet Explorer, Edge, Office, Visual Studio, and Windows. Eighteen of the updates are flagged as having Critical severity.

If you’re still using Windows 7, and you haven’t shelled out for Microsoft’s Extended Security Updates, you won’t find any of this month’s Windows 7 updates via Windows Update. You do have at least one other option: an organization called 0patch. These folks provide what they call ‘micropatches’ for known vulnerabilities in no-longer-officially-supported versions of Windows, including Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008. I haven’t tried these myself, but they seem legitimate. Well, presumably not in the view of Microsoft.

Windows 10 users will get the latest updates whether they’re wanted or not, although there are settings that allow you to delay them, for a while. That leaves Windows 8.1, for which Windows Update is still the appropriate tool.

Adobe logoAdobe once again tags along this month, with new versions of Reader and Acrobat. Most people use the free version of Reader, officially known as Acrobat Reader DC. The new version, 2020.009.20063, includes fixes for twenty-four security vulnerabilites in earlier versions.

About jrivett

Jeff Rivett has worked with and written about computers since the early 1980s. His first computer was an Apple II+, built by his father and heavily customized. Jeff's writing appeared in Computist Magazine in the 1980s, and he created and sold a game utility (Ultimaker 2, reviewed in the December 1983 Washington Apple Pi Journal) to international markets during the same period. Proceeds from writing, software sales, and contract programming gigs paid his way through university, earning him a Bachelor of Science (Computer Science) degree at UWO. Jeff went on to work as a programmer, sysadmin, and manager in various industries. There's more on the About page, and on the Jeff Rivett Consulting site.

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