Category Archives: Cloud

Security and privacy roundup for January 2016

Your devices are talking about you

You already know that your web browser is tracking your activity. You are probably also aware of ‘The Internet of Things‘ – the increasing prevalence of devices that are connected to the Internet – and you recognize that any such device can also track your activities. Bruce Schneier reveals the next step in this evolution: enabling devices to share information about you. Of course, since the goal of all this surveillance is merely better-targeted advertising, most people are unlikely to care. Still, if privacy and control are important to you, this will not be welcome news.

Brian Krebs reminded us that ransomware can affect files in your cloud storage space as well as on your physical computer and network-connected devices.

A summary of software vulnerabilities over at VentureBeat shows Mac OS X topping the list for 2015. Microsoft’s security efforts seem to be paying off, as the highest-ranked version of Windows on the 2015 list is Windows 8.1 at number 10, and fewer than half the vulnerabilities as OS X.

Serious vulnerabilities were discovered in OpenSSH (a very commonly-used secure terminal client), OpenSSL (the ubiquitous security library), and Trend Micro antivirus software.

Vulnerabilities in the Linux kernel (affecting Android phones and Linux PCs) remain unpatched on many affected devices.

Google produced more patches for vulnerabilities affecting Android devices, but as always, the patches are finding their way to devices very slowly.

The very weak hashing functions MD5 and SHA1 are still being used in HTTPS encryption in some contexts.

It’s official: your smart TV can become infected with malware.

Network devices made by Juniper and Fortinet were found to contain serious vulnerabilities, including an NSA-developed back-door function and a hard-coded back-door password (more).

The free-to-use deep search tool Shodan made the news when researchers showed that it can be used to find household cameras, including baby-cams. Note that the problem here is not Shodan, which is just a useful search tool. The problem is the failure to properly secure Internet-connected devices.

There were more serious corporate security breaches in January, at Time Warner and Linode. As usual in these cases, the login credentials of subscribers were obtained by the attackers.

Amazon’s security practices were (unwillingly) tested by a customer, and found seriously deficient.

More malicious apps were found in the Google Play store. Google removed those apps, but not until they were downloaded millions of times by unsuspecting Android device users.

LG fixed a critical security hole affecting as many as ten million of its mobile devices.