Category Archives: Chrome

Chrome 64.0.3282.167

A single security bug was fixed in Chrome 64.0.3282.167, released by Google on February 13.

The new version will find its way to your desktop automatically, unless you’re diligent about killing Google’s pesky auto-update processes. If that describes you, or you just don’t want to wait, you can usually encourage Chrome to update itself by navigating to > Help > About Google Chrome.

There’s additional information in the full change log for Chrome 64.0.3282.167.

Chrome 64.0.3282.140 released

There are about twenty changes in Chrome 64.0.3282.140. One of the changes is a fix for a security issue, and the rest are minor tweaks and other bug fixes.

As usual, the release announcement says that the new version “will roll out over the coming days/weeks”. Since this release includes a security fix, it’s a good idea to check what version you’re running by navigating to the About Chrome page ( > Help > About Google Chrome).

Chrome 64.0.3282.119 released

The latest version of Chrome is 64.0.3282.119. The new version, released earlier this week, fixes fifty-three security issues, and includes additional mitigations for the Spectre/Meltdown vulnerabilities.

The full change log lists ten thousand changes in the new version. There might be some interesting stuff in there, but I’m going to assume that if there was anything worth pointing out, Google would have done that in the release announcement.

Chrome 63.0.3239.108

Two security vulnerabilities, one of which has a High risk rating, are addressed in Chrome 63.0.3239.108. The log lists a few additional changes, none of which are particularly interesting.

There’s no easy way to disable automatic updates in Chrome. Generally, if there’s an update available, it will find its way to your computer within a few days via Google’s Update Service.

You can usually trigger an update by navigating to the About Chrome page ( > Help > About Google Chrome).

Flash 28.0.0.126

Adobe logoAdobe released a new version of Flash to coincide with yesterday’s Microsoft updates. Flash 28.0.0.126 fixes a few minor issues and one security vulnerability.

As usual, Chrome will update itself with the latest Flash, and Microsoft browsers will receive updates via Windows Update.

If you still use Flash, and in particular if you use a web browser that is configured to play Flash content, you should install the new version as soon as possible. Better still, stop using Flash altogether. Flash is being phased out in some browsers, including Firefox. Many web sites that formerly used Flash have switched to HTML5.

Chrome 63.0.3239.84

The change log for Chrome 63.0.3239.84 has ten thousand entries. I’d like to read it, and I might even find something interesting buried there, but instead I’ll assume Google would point out any notable changes in the release notes.

Alas, while the release notes do point out that the new Chrome includes fixes for thirty-seven security vulnerabilities, none of the other changes are discussed. In a way I suppose that’s a good thing: as long as Google isn’t making large changes or adding new features, while they continue to fix vulnerabilities and other bugs, the outcome is almost always going to be a better browser.

Chrome typically updates itself within a few hours or days of a new release, although in the release notes, Google says “This will roll out over the coming days/weeks.” Given the number of security fixes in this version, it’s a good idea to check the version you’re running, and hopefully trigger an update, by clicking Chrome’s menu button (three vertical dots at the top right), then choosing Help > About Google Chrome.

November updates for Adobe products

Adobe logoYesterday, Adobe announced updates for several of its main products, including Flash, Acrobat Reader, and Shockwave.

Flash 27.0.0.187 addresses five critical vulnerabilities in earlier versions. You can download the new desktop version from the main Flash download page. That page usually offers to install additional software, which you should avoid. Chrome will as usual update itself with the new version, and both Internet Explorer and Edge will get their own updates via Windows Update.

Acrobat Reader 11.0.23 includes fixes for a whopping sixty-two vulnerabilities, all flagged as critical, in earlier versions. Download the full installer from the Acrobat Reader Download Center.

Shockwave Player 12.3.1.201 addresses a single critical security issue in earlier versions. Download the new version from the Adobe Shockwave Player Download Center.

If you use Flash, Reader or Shockwave to view content from untrusted sources, or if you use a web browser with add-ons enabled for any of these technologies, you should update affected systems immediately.

Chrome 62.0.3202.62: thirty-five security fixes

If you want to test your web browser’s performance and memory management, just point it to the full change log for Chrome 62.0.3202.62. It’s a behemoth, documenting over ten thousand distinct changes.

Given the number of changes in Chrome 62.0.3202.62, I decided to skip reading the log and trust that Google would point out anything interesting in the release announcement.

The announcement for Chrome 62.0.3202.62 documents thirty-five fixes for security vulnerabilities, so clearly this is an important update. As for the other changes, Google says only this:

Chrome 62.0.3202.62 contains a number of fixes and improvements — a list of changes is available in the log. Watch out for upcoming Chrome and Chromium blog posts about new features and big efforts delivered in 62.

Chrome usually updates itself within a few days of a new release. You can trigger an update by navigating to the About page: click the three-vertical-dots menu button, then Help > About Google Chrome.