Category Archives: Mozilla

Thunderbird 60.3

Released on October 31, Thunderbird 60.3 fixes a handful of bugs — some of which are security-related — affecting multiple versions and platforms.

From the security advisory: In general, these flaws cannot be exploited through email in the Thunderbird product because scripting is disabled when reading mail, but are potentially risks in browser or browser-like contexts. What they seem to be saying is that these vulnerabilities cannot be exploited through the act of opening and reading email in Thunderbird. As for the part about browser-like contexts, well, that’s not at all clear. What contexts?

You can update your install of Thunderbird by clicking its hamburger menu button at the top right. Click the small arrow to the right of Help, then click About Mozilla Thunderbird. The About dialog should show your current version and offer an update if one is available.

Thunderbird 60.2.1

There aren’t as many desktop email applications around as there used to be. Sure, some of the old classics are still available (hello Eudora), but they typically don’t provide support for the latest technologies.

I’ve never been comfortable using a web-based application for my email. I do use GMail, but mostly for client support. I just prefer to have more control over my email archive than is possible with a web-based solution. Email is a critical component of my business and personal communications, and leaving it at the mercy of Google or some other company is not acceptable.

That said, there are still a few good options for desktop email on Windows. I still use Outlook, because it’s always been rock solid for me, handling dozens of accounts efficiently and reliably. But Outlook is only available as part of Microsoft Office, and only the more expensive Professional or Business versions at that. And Office is not cheap, costing upwards of $300 USD.

So I’m always on the lookout for alternatives to Outlook. And sitting at the top of that list is Thunderbird, Mozilla’s email client. Thunderbird’s three-pane user interface should be familiar to anyone who has used Outlook, Outlook Express, or just about any other Windows email application. It supports all current email-related technologies.

Mozilla issued a major update for Thunderbird in early October: version 60.0. This update provides numerous improvements to the user interface, including a much-needed revamp for the way attachments are handled.

More recently, Thunderbird 60.2.1 was released to fix seven security issues in earlier versions, as well as a few non-security bugs.

As with Firefox, you can check the current version of Thunderbird by navigating its ‘hamburger’ menu (top right) to Help > About Mozilla Thunderbird. Doing this will usually trigger an update, if one is available.

Firefox 63.0

Released last week, Firefox 63.0 provides fixes for at least fourteen security issues.

Firefox 63 also includes performance improvements, content blocking functionality, some user interface improvements, and a few other bug fixes.

In keeping with the trend towards wresting control of updates away from users, the option to Never check for updates was removed from the Preferences page (about:preferences). Sigh.

Firefox can be updated by navigating its ‘hamburger’ menu (button at top right) to Help > About Firefox.

Firefox 62.0.3: two critical security fixes

Yesterday, Mozilla released Firefox 62.0.3, which includes fixes for two critical security vulnerabilities in previous versions of the popular web browser.

The two vulnerabilities addressed in Firefox 62.0.3 are described in some detail on the associated security advisory page.

Depending on how your Firefox is configured, it may display a small update dialog, or it may simply update itself. To control what happens with new versions, navigate Firefox’s ‘hamburger’ menu (at the top right) to Options > General > Firefox Updates. While there, you can click the Check for updates button to trigger an update if one is available.

Firefox 62.0.2: one security fix

The latest Firefox includes fixes for a handful of bugs, including one security vulnerability: CVE-2018-12385 (Crash in TransportSecurityInfo due to cached data).

If your installation of Firefox is configured to update itself, it will probably get around to doing that in the next few days, if it hasn’t already. You can expedite the process by starting the browser and navigating to Help > About Firefox in its ‘hamburger’ menu at the top right of the browser window.

The release notes for Firefox 62.0.2 provide additional details.

Firefox 62.0: nine security updates

Despite the major version increment, Firefox 62.0 doesn’t really have any new features worth mentioning. However, it’s an important update, because it addresses at least nine security vulnerabilities that range from Low to Critical in severity.

One change in Firefox 62.0 is worth pointing out: the Description field for bookmarks has been removed. Any Description information you previously added to your bookmarks can still be exported from Firefox. From the release notes: “Users who have stored descriptions using the field may wish to export these descriptions as html or json files, as they will be removed in a future release.”

You can usually encourage Firefox to update itself by navigating its ‘hamburger’ menu to Help > About Firefox.

Firefox 61.0 – security and performance improvements

The latest Firefox release features faster page load times and tab switching, improvements to search provider setup, an improved dark theme, better bookmark syncing, and at least eighteen security fixes.

Settings related to the home page and ‘new tab’ page are now in their own section on Firefox’s Options pages. You can access the new section directly using this URL: about:preferences#home.

The Firefox 61.0 release notes provide additional details.

On most computers, Firefox will update itself. You can encourage it by visiting the About page: click the hamburger button, then select Help > About Firefox.

Firefox 60.0.2

When first published on June 6, the release notes for Firefox 60.0.2 didn’t mention anything about security, but they’ve since been updated to include a reference to a single vulnerability that is fixed in the new version.

The vulnerability fixed in Firefox 60.0.2 is flagged as having both Critical and High impact by Mozilla, and since there are as yet no details in the official vulnerability database for CVE-2018-6126, it’s difficult to know which is correct.

Regardless, if you use Firefox, you should update it as soon as possible. Depending on how it’s configured, Firefox will usually at least let you know that a new version is available within a few hours after it’s published. If not, you can usually trigger an update by clicking the ‘hamburger’ menu icon at the top right, then selecting Help > About.

Firefox 60

Mozilla is making things easier for IT folks with Firefox 60. A new policy engine allows Firefox to be deployed with custom configurations appropriate for business and education environments. This seems likely to increase Firefox’s presense on enterprise desktops.

The New Tab (aka Firefox Home) page gets a bit of an overhaul in Firefox 60, with a responsive layout that should work better with wide screens, saved Pocket pages in the Highlights section, and more reordering options.

The Cookies and Site Data section of Firefox’s Preferences page is now a lot easier to understand: the amount of disk space involved is shown, as are the implications of each option.

Twenty-six security vulnerabilities are fixed in Firefox 60.